Our 15” x 12” plaque is milled from solid walnut and finished with a high quality stain finish. It is the envy of professionals and the customary standard-setter to display career achievements and recognitions.

***You must be a member of the National Black Lawyers Top 100 to order this wall plaque.

Our 15” x 12” plaque is milled from solid walnut and finished with a high quality stain finish. It is the envy of professionals and the customary standard-setter to display career achievements and recognitions.

***You must be a member of the National Black Lawyers Top 40 Under 40 to order this wall plaque.

 

The perfect desk or bookcase display. The desktop marquee is 10.5” x 6.75” and elegantly frames your recognition in a brilliant Lucite enclosure. The sleek pedestal design makes it a timeless way to keep your recognition looking like new for years to come.

***You must be a member of the National Black Lawyers Top 100 to order this desk plaque

The perfect desk or bookcase display. The desktop marquee is 10.5” x 6.75” and elegantly frames your recognition in a brilliant Lucite enclosure. The sleek pedestal design makes it a timeless way to keep your recognition looking like new for years to come.

***You must be a member of the National Black Lawyers Top 40 Under 40 to order this desk plaque

The cast statue is 12” in height and set on a 4” stunning solid polished marble base. The base is personalized with a decorative engraving plate highlighting the organization of membership. There is no better way to display your membership than with this tasteful piece of legal artwork.

lady-justice-shop-statue

***You must be a member of the Top 100 or Top 40 Under 40 Black Lawyers to order this statue.

Upcoming Events

[nggallery id=1 w=600]
Dove ads reveal need for more blacks in corporate leadership
racial justiceBy NBL member Melanie Bates
Earlier this month, news broke that Dove posted a racially insensitive advertisement on Facebook. The ad appears to depict a Black woman who turns white after using the Dove product. It conveys the faulty message that white is clean and black is dirty. This is not the first time Dove has been scrutinized for publishing racially insensitive advertisements. In an ad with before and after pictures, they showed an array of women and signified the white woman as the desired result. Even worse, the company sold a lotion that had the label “for normal to dark skin,” indicating that dark skin is not normal. Unfortunately, these types of messages in advertising are not new. Blacks have been the subject of racist soap advertisements dating as far back as the 1700s. As a Black woman, I am outraged by what I saw. The reckless disregard of vetting ads for racially offensive content time and time again is simply unacceptable, especially during a period where our country is the most divided it has been in recent memory. By neglecting to do so, Dove has established a pattern and practice that should not be overlooked. We must demand answers to why these types of ads would make it past top level executives. This therefore speaks to a larger issue of the lack of Black women in corporate leadership. There needs to be more people of color at the top who are empowered to chime in when questionable acts are being contemplated. It is undeniable that racial diversity allows for a variety of innovative ideas leading to more equitable outcomes. Unless we make our voices heard and demand accountability, these despicable acts will continue.
Increasing employment opportunities for D.C.’s returning citizens
By NBL member Melanie Bates Earlier this week, Georgetown University released a report, African-American Employment, Population & Housing Trends in Washington, D.C. The key findings indicate African-Americans in the District of Columbia have experienced steady patterns of declining income gains, higher unemployment, and lower educational attainment than white residents. The report notes that by 2020, 50% of all new jobs will require at least a bachelor’s degree or above, and nearly 60% will require at least some form of education and training beyond high school. These requirements severely limit the ability of African-Americans to be competitive in the employment market. Further, 60,000 adult African-American D.C. residents have not finished high school, 50% have no formal education past high school (compared to 5% of white residents), and only 12.3% of African-Americans have a bachelor’s degree (compared to 37.1% of white residents). These statistics are devastating. The constraints discussed in Georgetown University’s report impact the District’s returning citizen population, nearly all whom are African-American, in an even more detrimental way. Approximately 60,000 D.C. residents have a criminal record and each year, an estimated 8,000 residents return to the District after serving prison sentences. I strongly believe returning citizen employment outcomes can be improved by beginning the job application process prior to release from incarceration. With a sufficient investment of resources, residents coming home could be contacted by a District government agency (or other affiliated organizations) while they are still incarcerated. Residents should be given the opportunity to complete an intake form that surveys their interests, educational level, and relevant skills. Having this information beforehand would accelerate the placement process. The agency/organization could contact potential employers so that meetings and interviews could be scheduled prior to release. Additionally, the agency/organization could send resources to residents that provide information about the interview process, such as resume formulation, practice interview questions, proper etiquette, and the like. All of this will build confidence and hope in the individual as well as increase the likelihood that they will follow through with the job application process. Coming home without a plan leads to unfavorable outcomes. Persons get frustrated with the system and often revert back to their previous behavior. Already having the job application process in play, and with the assistance of “Ban-the Box,” recidivism will be prevented and returning citizens will be kept on the path to success. Moreover, the D.C. Council passed the Incarceration to Incorporated Entrepreneurship Act of 2016, but it has not yet been funded. Fully investing in this initiative would most certainly assist with creating essential opportunities for our returning citizens.Baltimore prosecutor keeps up the fight
Marilyn MosbyMarilyn Mosby, the Baltimore prosecutor who charged six police officers in the shooting death of Freddie Gray, says despite death threats from that case, she's fighting new battles as she prepares to run for re-election. Three of the officers were acquitted, and the rest of the cases dismissed. Ironically, Mosby comes from a family of law enforcement; her grandfather, her mother and seven great-uncles were police officers. Her grandfather was a founder of the first black police organization in Massachusetts. Read more about challenges Mosby is facing now and in the future in this article at The Root.Podcast: When court-ordered rehab becomes slave labor
An Oklahoma rehab center is being sued after some of the people sent there said they were forced to work at a chicken plant that one described as "a slave camp." Christian Alcoholics & Addicts in Recovery, or CAAIR, was supposed to be a year-long rehabilitation treatment that defendants could opt for instead of going to prison. But instead of getting much of any substance abuse treatment at "the Chicken Farm," they worked for free, with CAAIR getting the pay. And if workers couldn't keep up or got hurt, they could be threatened with jail. Reveal from the Center for Investigative Reporting has more on the story and the lawsuit that was filed because of it. You can listen to a podcast of Reveal's investigation here.
Praesent quis sapien nulla, non luctus mi. Aliquam ultrices purus in mi placerat viverra nec et dolor. Donec luctus lacinia condimentum. Donec sit amet gravida urna. Suspendisse ut purus tortor. Vestibulum ut ante purus, feugiat blandit nunc. Aliquam ut eros nec diam sagittis adipiscing quis non arcu. Fusce feugiat, mauris in egestas laoreet, magna nisl iaculis metus, cursus malesuada dolor nisl ac turpis. Vestibulum nec odio purus, eget ultricies leo. Donec sit amet gravida urna. Suspendisse ut purus tortor. Vestibulum ut ante purus, feugiat blandit nunc. Aliquam ut eros nec diam sagittis adipiscing quis non arcu.