Trump accuses Black reporter of asking ‘racist question’ about his nationalist rhetoric

NEWSWEEK — President Donald Trump fired back at a Black female reporter who asked the president if his rhetoric about nationalism could be seen as heartening white supremacists across the country. The president called the question “racist.”

“On the campaign trail you called yourself a nationalist, some people saw that as emboldening white nationalists,” Yamiche Alcindor from PBS Newshour asked Trump before she was interrupted.

“I don’t know why you would say that,” Trump fired back at Alcindor’s inquiry. “That is such a racist question.”

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Louisiana votes to end non-unanimous jury verdicts, only Oregon remains

U.S. NEWS (AP) — A constitutional amendment to end non-unanimous jury verdicts in Louisiana was approved Tuesday by the state’s voters — a victory for a rare alliance of conservative and progressive organizations that got behind the measure to end a practice with roots in post-Civil War racism.

The amendment takes effect Jan. 1 and will leave Oregon as the only other state allowing split verdicts. It reverses a Jim Crow-era practice that made it easier to imprison non-whites by allowing as few as 10 members of a 12-member jury to convict defendants in felony cases not involving death sentences.

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GoFundMe donors raise more than $140K for teacher who punched student

THE HILL — An online fundraiser for a California teacher who was recorded on video punching a student who yelled racial slurs at him has surpassed $140,000.

GoFundMe page for Marston Riley, a music teacher at Maywood Academy High School in Los Angeles, had exceeded its initial $50,000 goal in just four days, topping $143,000 as of Wednesday afternoon.

Riley made headlines last week when he was captured on video striking a who repeatedly called him derogatory names and racial slurs.

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This Harvard Law grad took her final exam while in labor

Williams and her daughter Evelyn at the child's first birthday party. Photo courtesy of Good Morning America.

GOOD MORNING AMERICA — When Brianna Williams was giving birth to her daughter, she asked for an epidural so that she could finish her final exam. In an essay she wrote for Good Morning America, Williams reflects on her experience leading up to her daughter’s birth and the challenges of being a single mother while finishing her degree at Harvard Law School.

Here’s an excerpt from Williams’ inspirational essay:

“I asked for an epidural so I could hurry and finish an exam before the baby came. I do not know what made me feel most empty — the fact that I had no one by my side to celebrate my daughter’s arrival, or that I was already confronted with the tension of balancing two of my most important identities: mother and attorney.”

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Veterans Affairs official hung portrait of Ku Klux Klan’s first grand wizard in his office

Painting of Nathan Bedford Forrest hanging in VA Officer's office, obtained by ABC News

ABC NEWS — A senior official at the Veterans Affairs Department hung a painting of the first Ku Klux Klan grand wizard and Confederate general in his office but removed it after some employees circulated a petition to force him to take it down.

David Thomas, a deputy director in the VA office that verifies small businesses for government contracts, never directly received complaints from his coworkers about the painting, a spokesman for the federal agency said Wednesday.

The portrait depicts Nathan Bedford Forrest, a Confederate Army general turned inaugural KKK leader, posing on the back of a horse. The words “No Surrender” and the date 1862 are written on a title card below the painting.

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Florida governor’s debate gets heated: ‘The racists believe he’s a racist’

ABC NEWS —  A topic now engrained in the dynamics of the Florida gubernatorial debate, both candidates had a lot to say when it came to the controversies regarding racism.

Republican Ron DeSantis was asked about his affiliations with political donors and figures who have at various points made questionably racist remarks, including a donor who once called President Obama the N-word and his own use of the phrase “monkey this up” when referring to Democrat Andrew Gillum, his African-American opponent.

DeSantis got very testy on the topic, at one point saying he can’t know everything his supporters or people he is affiliated with could have said at one time or another. He instead said he would represent all Floridians, regardless of race, but would not participate in political correctness.

Gillum responded saying “I’m not calling Mr. DeSantis a racist, I’m simply saying the racists believe he’s a racist.”

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‘Existing While Black’ sheds light on racial profiling and discrimination

Upset Black Man

HUFFINGTON POST — HuffPost asked black readers to share their stories of being subjected to racial profiling and discrimination. They described moments when someone called the police on them for no apparent reason aside from their race. They recalled scenarios of cops stopping and searching them because their skin color made them look “suspicious.” They also said how maddening it is to live with the constant anxiety of possibly having their presence — and innocence — questioned.

Existing While Black is a small collection of real anecdotes that underscores the unjust policing of black bodies, according to readers. Due to how deeply racism is woven into society’s DNA, this list is by no means comprehensive. HuffPost will continue to update this list and highlight the constant burden we face. This issue deserves more attention than a few headlines in the news cycle.

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Louisiana might finally get rid of its racist jury system

Louisiana State Penitentiary

SLATE — On Nov. 6, Louisiana voters will decide the fate of a Jim Crow–era law that allows juries to convict people on felony charges with only 10 of 12 jurors agreeing on a guilty verdict. Roughly 2,000 inmates are currently serving life sentences as a result of nonunanimous verdicts in Louisiana.

The split-jury rule was adopted in 1898 in response to the equal protection rights awarded to black citizens by the 14th Amendment. To minimize the influence of black jurors, lawmakers made the change. At the constitutional convention where the law was instituted, its proponents made their motivation abundantly clear—white supremacy.

“Our mission was, in the first place, to establish the supremacy of the white race in this state to the extent to which it could be legally and constitutionally done,” reads an excerpt from the convention’s Official Journal of Proceedings.

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Arkansas sheriff photographs inmates in Nike to mock Colin Kaepernick

Photo courtesy of Shaun King via Huffington Post

HUFFINGTON POSTAn Arkansas sheriff’s office removed photos of its inmates in Nike T-shirts after they made the rounds on Twitter.

The Union County Sheriff’s Office posed at least 18 of its inmates in Nike T-shirts for their mugshots, then added the images to its online jail roster.

Columnist Shaun King tweeted the photos on Wednesday and said his source told him the mugshots were meant to mock Colin Kaepernick, the former NFL player whose protests of police brutality landed him an ad campaign with Nike.

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Trump’s economic boasts ring hollow in black communities

Empty Pockets

AP NEWS — While black employment may have improved, that hasn’t translated into broader economic gains.

That’s partly because African-Americans are still disproportionately toiling in lower-quality jobs. Black people make up roughly one-fifth of those working in temporary jobs, a figure that hasn’t changed much in the past five years, even as the economy has improved. Just 12 percent of all Americans are black.

And last year, Trump’s first in office, the income gap between whites and blacks widened slightly. The typical African-American household earned $40,258, down 0.2 percent from a year earlier, while white households saw an income gain of 2.6 percent, to $68,145.

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