Three NY teachers on leave after displaying noose images in the classroom

The classroom display created by three Long Island middle school teacher.

Photo: Authur L. Mackey, Jr. via NBC News

NBC News — Three teachers at a Long Island middle school are on paid administrative leave for displaying a collage in the classroom that included an image of two nooses labeled “back to school necklaces.”

According to data from New York State Education Department, during the 2017-2018 school year, Roosevelt Middle School’s student body was 46.6 percent Black, 55 percent Hispanic or Latino, and 0.4 percent multiracial. All three teachers involved were white, and the school claims to have taken “appropriate action” against the teachers for using “racially offensive images.”

The tricky part is that half of the community is outraged, and the other half sees the incident as a misunderstood joke. What do you think?

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Black teacher claims NY school district ignored discrimination and harassment, lawsuit filed

NBC NEWS — A high school English teacher employed with the Commack School District on Long Island said in a lawsuit filed last month that she has been the only black teacher in the district for 17 years.

Andrea Bryan’s lawsuit alleges that since she made a complaint in 2015 about the lead English teacher making “racially derogatory” comments, she has been subjected to discrimination and harassment by teachers and students in the district.

NBC News reports that as of the 2015-2016 school year, Commack school district’s high school was 86% white, according to the New York State Education Department.

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Using Civil War-era law, MS parents sue over ‘inequitable’ education

Alleged inequities in public education in Mississippi are at the heart of a lawsuit filed by the Southern Poverty Law Center. The SPLC is using a novel legal argument that Mississippi is failing to live up to its agreement to allow the state back in the Union after the Civil War. Read more about the novel legal approach in this story at the Washington Post. More on the lawsuit is also available at the SPLC website.